To understand how bandwidth is saved, let’s see what a reader receives by fetching a feed directly from a Web site and by fetching the same feed through RSScache.com. The feed contains the last 10 news of the Web site.

Getting feed from Web site vs RSScache.com

Direct access to the feed by the reader:

  A reader connects for the first time and retrieves the content of the RSS feed, getting the 10 latest news. The reader uses this URL to get the direct feed: http://www.website.com/feed.xml.
Later, the reader does another request to the feed. The whole content of the feed is sent back to the client, although no news has been added since the last request. The reader disregards duplicate news. The Web site and the reader both lose bandwidth. This steps repeats on and on.
A news is added to the RSS feed. The reader still gets 9 old news that it already knows about. Once again, bandwidth is lost.

Access to the feed using RSScache.com :

A reader connects for the first time and retrieves the content of the RSS feed, getting the 10 latest news. The reader uses this URL to get the feed: http:// my.rsscache.com/ www.website.com/feed.xml.
Later, the reader does another request to your feed. No news has been added since the reader's last request, so only an empty feed is sent to the reader. This optimises your bandwidth usage. As more requests are done by the reader, the more bandwidth is saved!
A news is added to the RSS feed. Only the added news is sent to the reader. Bandwidth usage is saved by sending only what is necessary!

By using RSScache.com , bandwidth is saved by sending only what the reader has never received. Use our technology and save up to 90% of your bandwidth!

Webmasters

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Users

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Enterprises

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